fugitive is a blog engine running on top of git using its hooks to generate static html pages. Read-only mirror von https://git.ludikovsky.name/fugitive.git/
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p4bl0 6fe7f7cc8a new project url 7 months ago
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.gitignore added link in titles 9 years ago
README.html new project url 7 months ago
build.sh rename README into README.html 5 years ago
gpl-3.0.txt add GPL file to make the licensing term clearer 5 years ago
html-gen.sh remove unnecessarily duplicated lines causing undeleted temp file bug 4 years ago
install.sh Sitemap generation 4 years ago
post-commit.sh post-receive now works :-) 9 years ago
post-receive.sh Changing mktemp calls and some two sed calls to make it work with BSD coreutils (and still GNU coreutils valid) 8 years ago
pre-commit.sh fixed pre-commit hook 8 years ago
pre-receive.sh now preventing commit when zero article (for real ^^) and push when fugitive.blog-url not set 9 years ago

README.html

fugitive: README

<h2 id="info">Info</h2>

<p>
fugitive is a blog engine running on top of git using hooks to generate
static html pages and thus having only git as dependency.
</p>
<p>
In its hooks, fugitive uses only standard UNIX® tools that are included in
the GNU core-utils package, plus sh as script interpreter. That's it.<br />
Moreover, everything that can be done using git, is.<br />
No dependencies like rack, heroku, or whatever Ruby gems you can think of. No
configuration files. No metadata in your articles files. Hell, if you want to
you could even make a <a href="#templating">template</a> that use git log as
storage backend, which means <em>no files</em> either, just and only git.
</p>

<h2 id="install">Install</h2>

<h3 id="build">Build</h3>
<p>
If you want to build fugitive from the source, clone the git repository:
<br />
<code>git clone https://code.up8.edu/pablo/fugitive.git</code>
<br />
Then go in the newly created directory: <code>cd fugitive</code>, and
run the build script: <code>./build.sh</code>.
<br />
This will generate an executable file &quot;fugitive&quot; which you can use
to create your blog.
</p>
<h3 id="create">Create a blog</h3>
<p>
There are two install modes for fugitive: local and remote. The local mode
should be used to install a repository where you edit your blog, and the
remote mode for a repository to which you're going to push to publish your
blog.<br />
The local mode can also be used to publish if you edit your files directly on
your server.
</p>
<p>
To create your blog run the command:<br />
<code>fugitive --install-<em>mode</em> &lt;dir&gt;</code>,
where <em>mode</em> is either &quot;local&quot; or &quot;remote&quot;.
<br />
This will create a git repository with appropriate hooks, config and files in
&lt;dir&gt;.
<br />
If &lt;dir&gt; isn't specified then the current working directory is used.
</p>
<p class="important">
Once you have installed your blog you need to set the <em>blog-url</em>
parameter in your git configuration. See <a href="#config">configuration</a>
for details.
</p>

<h2 id="config">Configuration</h2>

<p>
All these settings are in the &quot;fugitive&quot; section of the git config.
You can change them with the command <br />
<code>git config fugitive.<em>parameter</em> <em>value</em></code>,
where <em>parameter</em> is one of the following:
</p>
<dl>
<dt>blog-url</dt>
<dd>
This is the public URL of the generated blog. <strong>You need to set
it</strong> as soon as possible since it's required for the RSS feed (and
used in the default footer template).
</dd>
<dt>public-dir*</dt>
<dd>
This is the path to the directory that will contain the generated html
files. Default value is &quot;_public&quot;. You could set it to
&quot;_public/blog&quot; for instance if you want to have have a website in
&quot;_public&quot; and your blog in &quot;/blog&quot;.
</dd>
<dt>articles-dir*</dt>
<dd>
This is the path where fugitive will look for published articles. Default
value is &quot;_articles&quot;.
</dd>
<dt>templates-dir*</dt>
<dd>
This is the path where fugitive will look for templates files. Default
value is &quot;_templates&quot;.
</dd>
<dt>preproc</dt>
<dd>
If you want your article to be preprocessed by an external tool (markdown,
textile...) you need to set <em>preproc</em> to a command line that will
read on stdin and write to stdout.
</dd>
</dl>
<p class="note">
* Those paths are relative to the root of the git repository, must be in it
and must not start with &quot;.&quot; neither have a '/' at the end. Example:
&quot;dir/subdir&quot; is valid but &quot;./dir/subdir&quot; and
&quot;dir/subdir/&quot; are not.
</p>

<h2 id="usage">Usage</h2>

<h3 id="general-use">General use</h3>
<p>
Articles you want to publish should be a file without the .html extension in the
<em>articles-dir</em> directory (see <a href="#config">configuration</a>).
The first line of the file will be used as a title and the rest of the file as
the content of the article.
</p>
<p>
By default there's a &quot;_drafts&quot; directory in which you can put
articles you are writing and you want to version control in your git
repository but you don't want to publish yet.
</p>
<p>
When you commit change to a fugitive git repository, the post-commit hook
looks in the <em>articles-dir</em> directory
(see <a href="#config">configuration</a>) for newly added articles, modified
articles and deleted ones. Then it does the following things:
</p>
<ul>
<li>it generates static html files for newly added articles,</li>
<li>it regenerates static html files for modified articles,</li>
<li>it deletes static html files for deleted articles,</li>
<li>it regenerates static html files for articles that are just before and
after newly added and deleted articles (this to maintain the
&quot;previous&quot; and &quot;next&quot; links alive),</li>
<li>it regenerates the archives.html, tags.html, atom.xml, and rss.xml
files,</li>
<li>and finally it copies the static html file of the last article to
&quot;index.html&quot;.</li>
</ul>
<p class="note">
If a change happen in the <em>templates-dir</em> directory
(see <a href="#config">configuration</a>), then static html files for
everything is regenerated to make the change effective.
</p>
<p>
All generated files are created in the <em>public-dir</em> directory
(see <a href="#config">configuration</a>).
<p>
When you push to a remote repository installed with fugitive, the same thing
will happen but instead of looking only at the last commit, the hook will
analyse every changes since the last push and then (re)generate html files
accordingly.
</p>
<p class="warning">
Do not create an article file named &quot;archives&quot;.<br />
Do not create an article file named &quot;index&quot;.
</p>
<h3 id="templating">Template system</h3>
<p>
The better explanation about the templates system is to see what the default
templates looks like. But since they do not use all the offered
possibilities, here are some more explanations...
</p>
<p>
The fugitive template system uses xml preprocessor
syntax: <code>&lt;?fugitive <em>var</em> ?&gt;</code> is rendered as the
value of <em>var</em>. This choice has been made because with this syntax
templates are still valid xml (and html) document, and it is semantically
more accurate than xml comments (<code>&lt;!-- <em>var</em> --&gt;</code>).
</p>
<p>
In addition to variable rendering, there is a conditional and a foreach loop
constructs, plus an include directive.
</p>
<p>
The syntax of the include directive is <code>&lt;?fugitive
include:<em>file</em> ?&gt;</code> where <em>file</em> is relative to
the <em>templates-dir</em> directory
(see <a href="#config">configuration</a>). The includes are processed before
anything else.
</p>
<p>
The foreach loop construct is specific to the archives.html, tags.html,
atom.xml, and rss.xml templates and will therefore be described at the same
time. Where available, the loops are processed right after the includes.
</p>
<p>
The syntax of the conditional construct is as follows:
</p>
<pre>&lt;<span class="keyword">?fugitive</span> ifset:<em>var</em> ?&gt;
Template code which is ignored if <em>var</em> value is empty, and
which typically includes &lt;<span class="function-name">code</span>&gt;&lt;<span class="keyword">?fugitive</span> <em>var</em> ?&gt;&lt;/<span class="function-name">code</span>&gt;.
&lt;<span class="keyword">?fugitive</span> endifset:<em>var</em> ?&gt;</pre>
<p class="note">
Not every variable can be used in the conditional construct, this is indicated
in the description of those which can't.
</p>
<p>The following variables are available everywhere:</p>
<dl>
<dt>page_title</dt>
<dd>
Its value is &quot;archives&quot; in the archives.html template,
&quot;feed&quot; in the atom.xml and rss.xml template, or the article title
in the article.html template.
</dd>
<dt>blog_url</dt>
<dd>
The <em>blog-url</em> value in the &quot;fugitive&quot; section of the git
configuration (see <a href="#config">configuration</a>).
</dd>
<dt>commit_Hash</dt>
<dd>
Its value is the hash corresponding to the last commit that provoked the
(re)generation of the file.
</dd>
<p class="note">
This is case-sensitive. Compare this with the next one.
</p>
<dt>commit_hash</dt>
<dd>
Its value is the short hash (the seven first digit of the hash)
corresponding to the last commit that provoked the (re)generation of the
file.
</dd>
<dt>commit_author</dt>
<dd>
Its value is the name of the author of the last commit that provoked the
(re)generation of the file.
</dd>
<dt>commit_author_email</dt>
<dd>
Its value is the email of the author of the last commit that provoked the
(re)generation of the file (with '@' replaced by &quot;[at]&quot; and '.'
replaced by &quot;(dot)&quot;).
</dd>
<dt>commit_datetime</dt>
<dd>
Its value is the date and time of the last commit that provoked the
(re)generation of the file.
</dd>
<dt>commit_datetime_html5</dt>
<dd>
Its value is the date and time of the last commit that provoked the
(re)generation of the file, <em>but in an html5 <code>&lt;time&gt;</code>
compliant format</em>.
</dd>
<dt>commit_date</dt>
<dd>
Its value is the date of the last commit that provoked the (re)generation
of the file.
</dd>
<dt>commit_time</dt>
<dd>
Its value is the time of the last commit that provoked the (re)generation
of the file.
</dd>
<dt>commit_timestamp</dt>
<dd>
Its value is the unix timestamp of the last commit that provoked the
(re)generation of the file.
</dd>
<dt>commit_subject</dt>
<dd>
Its value is the subject (first line of the commit message) of the last
commit that provoked the (re)generation of the file.
</dd>
<dt>commit_body</dt>
<dd>
Its value is the body (the rest of the commit message) of the last commit
that provoked the (re)generation of the file. <strong>This variable can't
be used in the conditional construct.</strong>
</dd>
<dt>commit_slug</dt>
<dd>
Its value is the subject of the last commit that provoked the
(re)generation of the file but formatted to be file name friendly.
</dd>
</dl>
<h4>Variables specific to the article.html template:</h4>
<dl>
<dt>article_title</dt>
<dd>
Its value is the title of the article (the first line of the file).
</dd>
<dt>article_content</dt>
<dd>
Its value is the content of the article (the rest of the
file). <strong>This variable can't be used in the conditional
construct.</strong>
</dd>
<dt>article_file</dt>
<dd>
Its value is the file name of the article (without the .html extension).
</dd>
<dt>article_cdatetime</dt>
<dd>
Its value is the date and time of the publication of the article (the date
of the commit which added the article to the repository in
the <em>articles-dir</em> directory
(see <a href="#config">configuration</a>)).
</dd>
<dt>article_cdatetime_html5</dt>
<dd>
Same as previous, but in an html5 <code>&lt;time&gt;</code> compliant
format.
</dd>
<dt>article_cdate</dt>
<dd>
Its value is the date of the publication of the article.
</dd>
<dt>article_ctime</dt>
<dd>
Its value is the time of the publication of the article.
</dd>
<dt>article_ctimestamp</dt>
<dd>
Its value is the timestamp of the publication of the article.
</dd>
<dt>article_mdatetime</dt>
<dd>
Its value is the date and time of the last modification of the article
(the date of the last commit which changed the article file).
</dd>
<dt>article_mdatetime_html5</dt>
<dd>
Same as previous, but in an html5 <code>&lt;time&gt;</code> compliant
format.
</dd>
<dt>article_mdate</dt>
<dd>
Its value is the date of the last modification of the article.
</dd>
<dt>article_mtime</dt>
<dd>
Its value is the time of the last modification of the article.
</dd>
<dt>article_mtimestamp</dt>
<dd>
Its value is the timestamp of the last modification of the article.
</dd>
<dt>article_cauthor</dt>
<dd>
Its value is the author of the commit which added the article to the
repository.
</dd>
<dt>article_cauthor_email</dt>
<dd>
Its value is the email of the author of the commit which added the article
to the repository (with '@' replaced by &quot;[at]&quot; and '.' replaced
by &quot;(dot)&quot;).
</dd>
<dt>article_mauthor</dt>
<dd>
Its value is the author of the last commit which changed the article file.
</dd>
<dt>article_mauthor_email</dt>
<dd>
Its value is the email of the author of the last commit which changed the
article file (with '@' replaced by &quot;[at]&quot; and '.' replaced by
&quot;(dot)&quot;).
</dd>
<dt>article_previous_file</dt>
<dd>
Its value is the file name (without .html extension) of the previous
article ordered by publication date.
</dd>
<dt>article_previous_title</dt>
<dd>
Its value is the title of the previous article ordered by publication date.
</dd>
<dt>article_next_file</dt>
<dd>
Its value is the file name (without .html extension) of the next article
ordered by publication date.
</dd>
<dt>article_next_title</dt>
<dd>
Its value is the title of the next article ordered by publication date.
</dd>
</dl>
<h4>foreach loops in archives.html, atom.xml, and rss.xml:</h4>
<p>
Two foreach loops are available: <code>foreach:article</code>
and <code>foreach:commit</code>. The syntax is as follows:
</p>
<pre>&lt;<span class="keyword">?fugitive</span> foreach:article ?&gt;
Template code that will be repeated for each article and
where the values of &lt;<span class="function-name">code</span>&gt;article_*&lt;/<span class="function-name">code</span>&gt; variables are
set in accordance with the article each time.
&lt;<span class="keyword">?fugitive</span> endforeach:article ?&gt;</pre>
<pre>&lt;<span class="keyword">?fugitive</span> foreach:commit ?&gt;
Template code that will be repeated for each commit and
where the values of &lt;<span class="function-name">code</span>&gt;commit_*&lt;/<span class="function-name">code</span>&gt; variables are
set in accordance with the commit each time.
&lt;<span class="keyword">?fugitive</span> endforeach:commit ?&gt;</pre>
<p>
The only difference between the archives.html, atom.xml, and rss.xml
templates is that in atom.xml and rss.xml these constructs only loop on the
five last articles and commits.
</p>

<h2 id="hacking">Hacking fugitive</h2>
<p>
If you want to hack fugitive code to customize the behavior of the hooks, you
can either edit the hooks directly in your fugitive blog repository, or edit
them in the fugitive source code, then rebuild the <code>fugitive</code>
executable using the <code>build.sh</code> script provided in the source code
repository.
</p>
<p>
In the latter case and if you already have a fugitive blog running, you'll
need to install the new hooks. This can be done by running the command:<br />
<code>fugitive --install-hooks &lt;dir&gt;</code>, where &lt;dir&gt; is the
path to your fugitive blog repository, if it isn't specified then the current
working directory is used.
</p>
<p>
This can be handy if you decide for instance that you want to have the
last <em>n</em> articles on your index.html page rather than a mere copy of
the last article.
</p>

<h2 id="issues">Known issues</h2>
<p>
There seems to be some issues with the version of git provided in Debian
Lenny (1.5.*), I didn't investigate it yet, and I don't know if I'll do it,
because at this time Squeeze is already frozen and git 1.7.* is available in
the backports which are now officially supported by Debian.
</p>